No, you weren’t supposed to take that spoof seriously!

Summary

I can’t compete with this…

In a blogpost not so long ago, I looked at how British history might be viewed through the eyes of countries that England/Great Britain/The UK has been at war with over the centuries. It was called “History – What if we really are the bad guys?”

With all things 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War, I took a satirical swipe at the mainstream media, imagining how they might sensationalise it all.

“In your paper this weekend, we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the First World War as our finest boys set sail for the continent to rescue Europe from the despotic hordes that sought to invade our green and pleasant lands!

“Re-live the glorious colour of the Fields of Flanders as our brave heroes charged the German lines, falling gallantly in front of the Hun’s howitzers!

“Collect tokens starting tomorrow and send off for your own personalised spade so that you can dig your own trench so that you too can experience the buzz, excitement and thrill of the moment that British soldiers went over the top to face the foe!

“Included too are your own free packet of poppy seeds so that you can have a lasting tribute to the heroes that did not return. (Disclaimer – Poppy seeds sown in your garden at own risk – we are not responsible if your garden is overrun by them).”

One newspaper took the final paragraph and followed it literally to the letter.

When satire becomes a real paper headline offer for its readers - the top bit. From 8 March 2014.

When satire becomes a real paper headline offer for its readers – the top bit. From 8 March 2014.

“But we’ve still got six months to go till the anniversary!!!”

Quite.

It’s like when Bush did his ‘Yo Blair’ thing.

(The full transcript is here)

 

About these ads
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to No, you weren’t supposed to take that spoof seriously!

  1. Pingback: No, you weren’t supposed to take that spoof seriously! – A dragon’s best friend | Public Sector Blogs

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s